newnumber6: (lasers)
Continued from last post. First post of this whole series is here, for explanation purposes.

Before, I continue, a few comments on the last part that LJ didn't let me post cause it was too long:
Read more... )

And on to the new:Read more... )

Comments always welcome.
newnumber6: (otp)
This is year 3 of my Runaways Alternate Volume 3. See that post for explanations of what this is all about. Last chunk is here. A bit rushed due to trying to get it out before NaNo month, so excuse typos.
Read more... )
Here's a good time to break, since LJ won't let me post stuff too long.
Next Post, issues #31 to #36, back to the main plot of the year.

PerExWriMo

Nov. 1st, 2009 05:58 pm
newnumber6: (comics)
So, it's November, the National Novel Writing Month. Like in most previous years, I'm not doing it as expected. However, I am doing another Personal Extra Writing Month, with the goal of reaching 50,000 words, just spread about amongst various short story projects. And I've already done 2000 for today, so I'm off to a good start (even if the story I was writing is probably unsalvagable without a complete rewrite).

The truth is, however, this isn't just a Personal Extra Writing Month, it's more of a KickStart month. See, I haven't posted about this, but for the last few months I've slacked off and haven't done any of my forced writing. Which isn't to say I haven't written, it's just either been dribs and drabs when the mood struck me, or on projects I don't count. But still, not as much as I wouldn't. There's many reasons for this, but most boil down to that I've been depressed, discouraged, and lacking new ideas and drive, and for the few months before I quit the metered writing, I was just chugging along without much drive, churning it out without getting any new ideas I wanted to work on. I thought maybe a break to refresh myself might help. And to a certain extent, it has. I've had a few new story ideas in the time off. I've identified a couple of the timesinks that I think hurt me in writing, and tried to cut them out of my routine. So, I'll do PerExWriMo to try to get myself back in gear (although I'll be taking off December as usual because Christmas month is just a pain all around with too much stuff on my mind), and hopefully start fully writing again my normal way in 2010, and also submitting stories again and start the whole rejection cycle. Anyway, crossed fingers.

Anyway, one of the writing things that "doesn't count" but has taken up some of my time and writing urges, are my Runaways alternate Vol 3 outlines. And, anticipating November, I finished up Year 3. I'll be posting it next, I think. I know, most of you don't care, it's basically unformed fanfic, but it does entertain ME (sadly, more than actual comics have in some time).

In other news, well, V starts this week. I don't have high hopes, but I'll watch. I'm still liking Stargate Universe... hasn't found its legs yet, but I like it well enough that it's probably my favorite show currently on (which really says more about the lack of quality shows on now than SGU). Heroes is interesting if you can completely ignore that they're still completely ignoring their own past (a couple weeks ago Peter sought out HRG to see if he knew a Healer. While his daughter was there. You know, the one who's blood healed him from a bullet to the head? But nobody seems to remember that). Enough to keep watching it. Other shows aren't really even worth much of a mention.

I've kept watching Classic Who, actually, instead of cutting it off, just because timing worked out that way, had new eps finish d/l when I had downtime and nothing to watch. Only about 4 or so stories left in Davison's run. I'll give a more complete rundown on my thoughts when I'm finished, but I'm actually enjoying the series more than I have in a while, somewhere around the end of 4 the writing took a big jump up in quality and inventiveness.
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
Here's my yearly entry for One Hundred Words of Horror... only a few, sort of ran out of time and didn't have much inspiration so they're not my best, but I do like the tradition and wanted to come up with something.

Prognosis

The surgery went very well. Your husband is responsive, and the new organs are functioning better than the old ones.

Prognosis is good. I had to remove more tissue than I anticipated, but the organs need room to grow. I just want to warn you he may not look much like the man you knew.

But he’ll live. That’s the important thing. Assuming rejection doesn’t set in, he can look forward to many, many years.

With a result like that, why worry over the little details, like that I didn’t get his consent.

Or that I’m not really a doctor.

-

Inoperable

They say hallucinations are a side effect of the tumor. But I know these aren’t hallucinations. Hallucinations don’t leave a trail of dead bodies.

They’re not just dead. Mutilated, like something exploded inside them.

You’re probably thinking like the police do, that I killed them, in a delusional state. But it’s not hallucination. I don’t see anything except the carnage, and they saw that too, just a little later.

I’ve figured it out. It’s not a tumor. It’s a transmitter. To some other dimension. Telling them to come. And they’ll be coming for you soon, unless you cut it out.

-

Little Bundles of Joy

Nobody noticed the loss of the children. The thing had devoured their souls, but they kept eating, sleeping, and even playing. You don’t really need a soul to play. It’s as biologically hardwired as hunger. Children’s souls are undeveloped, barely there. Replaceable.

So the thing lent them its motives, to lure others to that spot in the woods. Parents made better meals but poor tools. Their bodies were too accustomed to their souls, and without them, ran down, and soon died in squalor.

But the children would still play, and could always be adopted, smiling automatons waiting for new thoughts.

-

(Last year's entries can be found here).

If you do the One Hundred Words of Horror meme, feel free to post a link in the comments so people who are interested can follow up on people not on their flist.

Happy Halloween, everyone!
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
Since I only get one comic book a month now, that's what I got:

New Mutants #6 (not bad for a 'heroes returning from the dead' crossover plot)

Full reviews as usual at my comic reviews site for anyone interested.

Also picked up at the used bookstore (for only 50 cents!): Year's Best SF #9 (short story collection).
Pretty sure I don't have that one, stories in it by Doctorow and Stross among others, should be worth a look. And even if it WAS a rebuy, hey, 50 cents!

Work was okay, although they showed up earlier than I did, so a lot of work awas done for me. Which is good, I guess, since I still get paid the same amount, but I still feel bad. Ah well.

On the way to the comic store I noticed a building was owned by the "WTF Group". WTF? Anyway, drizzly the whole day so I didn't get any reading while walking done either. :P. Ah well.
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
So, in addition to the New Doctor, and the New Companion, (and I suppose the New Logo) one of the things fans are generally eager to get an advance look at is the New Tardis... or at least, the new interior. They had to change the set for the switch to HD, and the show is known for changing the look on a semi-regular basis (they even included a line in Time Crash about 9/10's TARDIS look being the "Desktop Theme" (called Coral, for that variation). Well, we've got our first hint of what the next look will be. It's here, and it's pretty safe for spoilerphobes, don't seem to be anything in the pictures or article itself aside from the Tardis pic that could give anything away (can't vouch for comments of course, but I don't think there is anything there either).

My thoughts... okay, not as different as I expected. Read more... )
newnumber6: (rotating2)
Book Foo to start off with:

Finished: The Science Fiction Century, Vol 1(short story collection)
Started: Blindsight, by Peter Watts (reread)

Like all short story collections there's a mix of good and rather dull, and stories I've read before of each. This one had a bit of a focus on much older material of the HG Wells/Jack London eras (though there's plenty of new material too). There was even a non-Lovecraft Lovecraftian story (The Hounds of Tindalos). I read all of them, even the rereads, with the exception of E.M. Forster's "The Machine Stops" which I've read SO MANY times in school alone that I just can't bear it any more.
(minor concept related spoilers behind cut, no biggies).

Read more... ) Anyway, probably a bit less of the 'good' to 'less interesting' ratio in this collection, but I didn't hate it.

Finished: Nineteen Eighty-Four, by George Orwell (reread)

Can't really comment on this one since I've read it so many times, it's like visiting an old friend. One who kicks you in the gut to say goodbye, but nonetheless!

Started and Finished: Rainbows End, by Vernor Vinge
Started: Eon, by Greg Bear (reread, but long enough ago that I can barely remember anything but the back of the book premise)

Rainbows End was a reread, so no need to get too detailed about the thoughts, but once again I really like the near future technological gadgetry that you can almost believe is just around the corner.

Had some memorable dreams lately, although a few of them have faded from memory, I still wanna record them. So, behind the cut, Zombies (with guest appearance by Zombie Flash), The Avatarverse, and bio-forming. Read more... )
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
Almost forgot. I've done this the last couple years now, and a couple people have participated. But, what the heck. We're about 2 weeks from Halloween. This is either a meme, if people are interested and want to take it up, or just something I plan on doing personally if not:

In the spirit of upcoming Halloween, and as sort of a last minute whet-the-appetite for Nano, I present "One Hundred Words of Horror for Halloween". Nano's about writing big, this is about writing small.

The rules:
1. Write short horror stories, and post them on Halloween.
2. Each story must be exactly 100 words. No more, no less (you can choose to count arguable symbols important to the story either as words or not as you wish). This amount does not include the title.
3. The stories must be in some way horror-related. This doesn't necessarily mean they have to be scary - you can deal with horror themes in a humorous way - but it's Halloween, so these should be in a Halloween spirit.
4. Post as many stories as you like.
5. (Optional) Respond to other people's stories with candy!


Don't really know if I'll do more than one since I'm in a bit of a low ebb creativity wise, but I'll try.
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
Prisoners of Gravity to start off with again.

Writers' Workshops/Clarion - November 10, 1993
More advice for writers, this time on how to become a better writer and focusing on the various Writer's Workshops.

Part One: Damon Knight (on how Clarion is set up), Kate Wilhelm (on what Clarion/other writer workshops does for a writer, and the 'writer's apprenticeship' period), Kristine Katheryn-Rusch (on what Clarion instructors do to encourage), Connie Willis (on how critiquing other people's work is what makes you a better writer), Geoff Ryman (on the training your own editor),
Part Two: Connie Willis (on her approach to teaching writing, and the importance of plotting as a skill), Nina Kiriki Hoffman (Clarion graduate, reading a bit of a story she did at Clarion, and giving her reaction to turning it in), Kim Antieu (on why Clarion tends to lead to getting successfully published), James Alan Gardner (on advice he got at Clarion that didn't particularly work for him, a Frost quote about writing vs talking about the stories), Kate Wilhelm (on how there's multiple ways to write), story about Harlan Ellison being kicked out of a writing class, Harlan Ellison (on inspiring fear in his Clarion students, and how everyone thinks they can write),
Part Three: Harlan Ellison continued (breaking the spirit of dilettantism, and giving The Great Secret of Writing), William F. Wu (about how something Harlan Ellison said inspired him for the story he's best known for), Geoff Ryman (on what Clarion gives participants than what they did before), Connie Willis (on the Clarion Slump, and learning to write in very small bits when you have very limited time), general advice, More on Nina Kiriki Hoffman's story reading.

Games: November 3, 1993
SF Authors using games people play for story fodder.

Part One: Terry Pratchett (reading from Small Gods), Lynda Barry (on her comic character Marlys who creates her own games, and why kids like inventing their own games), Poul Anderson (on "The Immortal Game", a story about a chess game from the point of a chessman), John Brunner (on adapting a real chess game and disguising it as a novel), Greg Bear (on Anvil of Stars, in which he has characters introducing chess, a zero sum game, to a pacifist alien race),
Part Two: Kristine Kathryn-Rusch (on poker playing a big role in her DS9 novel The Big Game and how poker reflects how people think), David Brin (on why the 'Game of Life' is important in Glory Season), Nancy Kress (on her story Touchdown which involves a game centered around the ruined planet Earth), Iain M. Banks (on the importance of Play, and how we use games much like animals use play, just on a different level, and the growing importance of games to simplify the complexity of life, and designing the game of Azad in The Player of Games),
Part Three: Steven Barnes (on real role playing games vs Dream Park, and why he doesn't game), Sean Stewart (on Dreamquest, a LARP, and how the difference between fantasy novel writing), Pierre Savoie (RPgamer, on how reading Ringworld the novel improves the experience of Ringworld the RPG, and how RPG can give insights to a novel universe its based on), David Pringle (on editing novels/short stories for Games Workshop based on Warhammer, Warhammer 40k, etc, and one particular book set in Near Future Earth)

Awards: January 28, 1993
Awards and what they mean to the creators who get them.
Part One: Kristine Kathryn-Rusch (on how important different awards are to SF writers), list of dfifferent awards, Samuel R. Delany (on the impact of winning many Hugos and Nebula awards), Jerry pournelle (on the benefit of awards giving a good break), John Brunner (on how awards don't transform your career instantly, but improves your long-term sales), Sharyn McCrumb (on how publishers work and how awards alter your treatment, and how sometimes they can be meaningless based on who's giving the awards), Joe Haldeman (on how the Forever War winning the Hugo, Nebula, and Ditmar, affected him, and the political aspects to awards)
Part Two: Nancy Kress (on her first Nebula award having no visible effect on her), James Morrow (on Nebula winning having a big psychological impact and getting him on the map, and the role of politics in the Nebula), Lisa Tuttle (on declining the Nebula Award for 1981), Gibson (on winning the triple award for Neuromancer, and how the location of the Worldcon might have helped him win the Hugo)
Part Three: Story about Neil Gaiman winning a World Fantasy Award and them rewriting the rules so comics can't be nominated, Neil Gaiman (on the effect of his awards being mainly to terrify him), Dave Gibbons (on winning the special Hugo Award for Watchmen), Harlan Ellison (on how him winning awards pisses people off, his thoughts about his award winning short story, Jeffty is Five, his disdain for awards, awards being detrimental to the writer), PoG itself winning an Aurora Award.

That's the last of the PoGs posted to Youtube at the moment, so next week I probably won't be doing any more.
In PoG related news, I think Neil Gaiman may be cyberstalking me. Well, not really, but it's more fun to say it that way. It's just that last week, right after I posted about the PoG episodes I watched (including two with him in it), he posted on twitter a link to the same ep. About 2 hours after. That might just be a weird coincidence, but it's the second time something like that's happened with him where I post something fairly obscure involving him that's been around for a while, and he posts about it elsewhere within hours. (Of course, more likely either there's an intermediate step of sharing from people I know, or he's got a Google Alert out on himself. If the latter's true, Hi there!).

In other TV news, lets see... not really much to talk about, actually. SGU was a not bad episode, but (spoilers ahead, and more unanswered questions) Read more... )

And, finally had Thanskgiving, since family was working last week. And actually some was working this week too, so it was a bit of a small affair with lots of leftovers. Was good... turkey, roast potatoes, ham, carrots, greek rice, french stick bread, pretty awesome gravy, pumpkin pie with whipped cream. Was quite good, and ofcourse nice to see family that I haven't seen in a while.

TV roundup

Oct. 11th, 2009 10:32 am
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
Starting as usual with PoG links.

Advice: Advice from SF/Comic Creators to people starting out in the field... (April 16, 1992)
Part One: Nancy Kress (read as much as you can, and persist, and don't write only when you're in the mood), Candas Jane Dorsey (what makes bad SF, the "Rod and Don Dialogue"), Lewis Shiner (don't start, it's a tremendously discouraging business, and if you're going to, get a day job), Kathy Gale (UK Editor, always submit in a professional way),
Part Two: Kim Stanley Robinson (responding on OSC's advice of "Primacy of Event over Character" and Card not following his own advice, kind of rips on Card a bit too), Tanya Huff (on the pros and cons on writer's groups), Ed Bryant (on Writer's Workshops like Clarion), Dan Simmons (on how the Milford Writer's Workshop helped him), Neil Gaiman (on his experience at a Milford and learning nothing about writing but learning about reading), shift in focus to comics. Frank Miller (know what you want)
Part Three: Fabian Nicieza (take writing courses, plan to have another career, work through independents/small press), M.W. Kaluta (on how he got his first full professional gig on The Shadow, and his advice), Gene Colan (you have to love it, don't do it for the fame), Sergio Aragones (practice, and think ahead at how the world may change). Summary from the host, and a closing clip from Dan Piraro (stay away, I don't want the comptetition)

Farewell (Season 1 finale)
Assorted promotions, Dick Tracy (movie and the then-recent comics), TMNT (in advance of the first live action movie), Cartoon All-Stars to the Rescue, Archie news, Incredible Hulk comic, 1990 Earth Day, interviews with Max Collins, Rob Salem, artist Dale Keown... very disjointed and none of it terribly interesting so I won't do the full clip-by-clip summary. Part One: Part Two: Part Three:

Memory (December 8, 1993)

How we're defined by our memories, in SF and Fantasy and comics
Part One: Lynda Barry (on what bring childhood memories for her, a trick for remembering things in a different way that you wouldn't normally, triggering other people's memories in writing), Neil Gaiman (on converting his memories into a comic and being replaced by it), Dave McKean (on using collages to represent memory), Neil Gaiman (on suddenly realizing something about your childhood memories as an adult because as child you don't know what's significant), Michael Moorcock (on his childhood memories of WWII shaping the landscapes of his fiction)
Part Two: Harlan Ellison (on what triggers memories for him, and exorcising hurtful memories with writing, and gives a couple of his favorite quotes about memories), Howard Hendrix (on the memory of his brother shaping one of his stories, and the difference of how memory in fiction compared to real life), Harry Harrison (on how memory works, short term vs long term memory, and the disadvantages to a linear memory of computers)
Part Three: William Gibson (on Agrippa, and Cyberspace as a metaphor for memory), Iain M. Banks (on his fascination with memory and the links between identity and memory), Brian Aldiss (on writing his own autobiography, and a story of a memory he'd written when he was 16), Edward Bryant (on how our memory shapes us and lack of memory also influences us)

Medicine and Nanotechnology (December 1, 1993)
Part One: Frederick Pohl (on people selling off organs to finance their trip to Gateway, and the real black market for organs), Nancy Kress (on writing "The Mountain to Mohammed", and her growing concern about health insurance, and the tough choices involved in controlling medical costs, and worries about gene scanning to mark people as uninsurable), Joel Davis (on the Human Genome Project changing the way medicine is practiced)
Part Two: Joel Davis again (on who owns the rights to the drugs created by using human DNA), Nancy Kress (on relaxing the controls of testing drugs on the dying), John Clute (on nanotechnology as a trend in SF), William Gibson (on including nanotech in Virtual Light, and finding it creepy), Tony Daniel (on Nano as the 'new magic' of SF), Stven Barnes (on linking Nanotech and Dinosaurs in The Barsoom Project, and where he researched it), Ian McDonald (on including nanotech in Necroville and his ideas of what resurrecting the dead might mean)
Part Three: Michael Skeet (on his story Relics, and whether writers get carried away with nanotech), Dave Smeds (on the practical obstacles to reaching nanotech), Greg Bear (on writing Blood Music before nanotechnology really became well-known, and why he use it, and his own sins of treating nanotech as 'magic', and the legacy of the Frankenstein image, and his own feeling that we need to know as much as possible)

Next Week, Writer's Workshops, Games, and Awards, the last set of PoG links until the person posting them posts some more, I guess.

In other TV news, what's been new... Heroes, meh. I think it's the last year anyway, so its not really worth getting worked up about, but the developments in the latest ep do not particularly interest me. Flashforward is still entertaining in terms of its normal plot and it's done a good job of keeping me interested with some of the twists they've introduced, although some sloppiness with how the visions work still annoys me.

Glee's still okay, but I'm finding the main characters less and less likable with each ep, with a few exceptions (I liked the Quinn/Rachel scene in this week's episodes) and they really need to start focusing on the minor characters.

Supernatural had a solid MOTW episode.

The big TV story for me was that Stargate Universe had the third part of its premiere, and again, not bad. There's a couple spoilery elements I want to talk about behind the cut (including a possible "I CALLED IT" moment), and some speculation/wonderings for the future: Read more... )


I think that's it for this week. It's Thanksgiving Weekend here in Canada, so to all the Canucks on my list, Happy Thanksgiving. Except, not for me. Apparently most of my immediate family is working this weekend, including tomorrow, so we won't be doing anything until sometime a little later. So no big meal for me, alas. Oh well.
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
Projects: (October 3, 1991) - Isolated upcoming projects in comics, animation, and SF.
Part One: Mike Carlin (on The Psycho), George Pratt (on a comic project about the Blues), Neil Adams (on Bucky O'Hare the animated series based on a comic)
Part Two: James Morrow (on his upcoming novel Towing Jehovah), Michael Swanwick (on Stations of the Tide), William Gibson (on Virtual Light), Dan Simmons (on doing a movie treatment for Carrion Comfort, and co-writing a SF mystery involving fractals and chaos theory)
Part Three: Simmons continued (a bit specifically on the problems of combining SF and mystery), Michael Dorn (on a storyline he'd like to see in ST:TNG, connecting Worf to Cyrano de Bergerac, and his role in Star Trek 6), fandom rumors about ST6 from Toronto Trek, Walter Koenig (on writing a treatment for a ST movie that got rejected, and a suggestion he made for ST6 involving the death of a main character), a viewer letter about the 'death of Star Trek'.

Utopia: March 18, 1993
Utopias in comics and SF

Part One: Bruce Sterling (on Utopias being Bogus), Clive Barker (on Plato's horrible definition of Utopia), Alan Moore (on exploring Utopia in Miracleman, and Utopia as a verb, and the superhero dream being antihuman), Neil Gaiman (agreeing with Utopia as a verb, but disagreeing with the idea that Miracleman actually dealt with a Utopia, and the problem with Utopia is that once you've got it, you fill it with people), Mark Buckingham (on avoiding dealing with Miracleman himself and looking at the rest of the world), Neil Gaiman again (on pulling focus back away from Miracleman himself), Samuel R. Delany (on Triton as a 'sexual utopia', differences from SF thinking and Utopian thinking)
Part Two: Clive Barker (on why fantastic fiction is the perfect place for Utopias), James Morrow (on a 'Utopia' city based on complete honesty in City of Truth and a pacifist utopia in The Wine of Violence), Geoff Ryman (on the Child Garden being an ambiguous utopia, and why utopias often focus on a particular person against the society), Ian M. Banks (on using a protagonist opposed to the Culture in Consider Phlebas, and writing along the outskirts of a Utopia)
Part Three: Sean Stewart (on Passion Play, which involves a dystopia evolving out of an attempt to create a Christian Utopia, and the need for Faith for a society to work), Kim Stanley Robinson (on his utopia novel, Pacific Edge and the question of "Utopia: Can we get there from here?", and the problem of multinational corporations being the biggest threat to a 'better world', and ending his book on a sad note)

Ecology in comics and SF: April 22, 1993
Part One: Frederick Pohl (on Our Angry Earth, a non-fiction book on ecology with Isaac Asimov, and why he doesn't think Zero Population Growth is the most urgent need), Paul Chadwick (creator of Concrete, on what he sees as the biggest Ecological Problem facing us, OverPopulation, and whether/how politics should play a role), Kim Stanley Robinson (on the importance of population control)
Part Two: Paul Chadwick (discussing the religious "be fruitful and multiply" and reading a speech from Concrete about current population expansion), Kim Stanley Robinson (on the Earth's maximum sustainable population), Jerry Pournelle (on solutions to population growth by producing wealth), Joe Haldeman (on tackling overpopulation in The Forever War, and his personal choice not to contribute to it, compared to people in third world countries who sometimes have no choice)
Part Three: Barry B. Longyear (on why Zero Population Growth became 'uncool' and the problems of enacting it in reality), David Brin (on legislating legal population limits in his novel Earth, and the US "growing up", and protecting your greatgreatgreatgrandchildren as a 'genetic investment', and visiting Easter Island)

Next week I'll do Advice (which I thought I'd do this week but got a bit behind on time), Memory, and maybe Medicine & Nanotechnology.

Continuing on TV, I finally finished Tom Baker's run on Doctor Who. Watched the first Davison episode too. Might watch one more to get a sense of him since he spent most of this one in regeneration madness. Overall, my thoughts on the Fourth Doctor (and a bit that he sheds light on Ten) Read more... )
Do like the new team of companions so far. Tegan, Adric, and Nyssa give me a little bit of the old Jamie/Zoe vibe. Nice to have a set of companions with skills that mesh together well, instead of one companion having to either be superman/woman to compete with the Doctor, or be all but useless in the face of his genius except for legwork.

Otherwise, FlashForward's still in the 'not bad, but we'll see' territory. Heroes is still marginally better. I can't help but think that if they ditched almost all of the 2nd or 3rd season entirely, and just attached this season directly to this one with maybe a tiny bit of connective plot, many of the elements would be workable, even interesting (the current status of Sylar with respect to Matt would be an entertaining way of keeping the actor but not having the problems of the uberpowerful character) but I can't completely forget the past.

The only big new series premiere of the week is Stargate: Universe. Overall, I enjoyed it, although at present I think it's below both SG1 and Atlantis in quality. The early worries/complaints (usually based solely on casting) of it being "Stargate: 90210" seem to be wholly without merit, but there is a strong taste of the new BSG in terms of style. In fact, it looks almost as though... you know in 200 where they did parodies of other SF shows (and a few non-SF shows)? It looks almost as though somebody said, "Hey, let's copy BSG's style for one of those", except instead of being a parody, they did it completely seriously. Very similar. A bit disorienting, but I'm sure I'll get used to it. (a bit more spoilery stuff behind the cut) Read more... )
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
This week I got two books:

New Mutants #5 (quieter issue, enjoyable, but with weird art)
Runaways #14 (sooo disappointing. What happened to you, Runaways? You used to be cool.)

Full reviews as usual at my comic reviews site for anyone interested.

Work was okay. I must have left late or got caught in a time warp or something because the truck was there (very slightly) before me but arrived about the same time as usual. Had to do a bit of extra work (for extra money) helping out with some other stuff too, but that's not a big deal.

And it was the first time since before summer began that I had to wear my jacket to feel comfortable (well, technically, on Monday it probably would have helped... the temperature wasn't the issue, but I didn't check the weather before I left for work and it started pouring during work and I had to walk home for an hour with no umbrella wearing only jeans and a thin white t-shirt). I probably coulda gone without it but it woulda been chilly.

Birthday

Sep. 28th, 2009 12:43 pm
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
Happy Birthday [livejournal.com profile] argaud!!

TV and PoG

Sep. 27th, 2009 10:10 am
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
Prisoners of Gravity links first:

Women
Women in SF, Fantasy, and Comics

Part One: Trina Robbins (on how she first got hooked on comics), June Brigman (on why women don't get into comics, and trying to change it using Barbie comics), Louise Simonson (on lack of things in conventional superhero comics for women to relate to), Kate Worley of Omaha, the Cat Dancer (on whether she's bothered by being in one of the few prominent female comics creators), Elaine Lee (on the difficulty of breaking into comics and the 'boys club'), Chris Claremont (on why he was renowned for good female characters and how it became a cliche for him)
Part Two: Steve Bissett (on why comics are so slow to recognize women, and some of the key roles women played in comics). Shift of focus to SF. Lois McMaster Bujold (on whether SF is a good platform for a treatment of women's issues, and her most 'feminist' book), Veronica Hollinger (professor on SF) (on who are the landmark female figures in SF and male writers who are most 'feminist'), Candace Jane Dorsey (on leaving out gender pronouns in her stories), Pamela Argent (on 'strong female characters' who are just men in women bodies), Gregory Benford (on the tension between the sexes as being a good thing and some of the difficulties on juggling everything in SF compared to toher fields)
Part Three: Leona Gom (on creating a 'last man' in an all female world), a story about James Tiptree Jr. (actually a woman under a pen name) being asked to leave a summit on feminism in SF. Lois McMaster Bujold (on if there are difficulties in writing male viewpoints). Switch in focus to Fantasy: Karen Wehrstein (on her own challenges in writing women characters), Tanya Huff (on whether fantasy has improved in terms of the women, and info about something she changed about her own work on realizing it was somewhat sexist), Terence M. Green (on how men and women are different), Trina Robbins (on the complaint about things that interest women being 'banal')

Leisure - May 2, 1991
How we will spend out leisure time in the future, according to SF
Part One: Lois McMaster Bujold (on mandatory zero-gee workouts and the physiological adaptations of zero-g), Andrew Weiner (on some of his leisure-centered short stories, in particular one about filling time in a permanent unemployment), Christopher Hinz (on the idea of recreational space colonies), Jack Womack (on leisure time, or lack thereof, in his Draco books), Gregord Benford (on the management of leisure, and passive leisure), William Gibson (on dismissing 'television' as 'empty calories' leisure, and the mystery of TV and media and what it's doing to us)
Part Two: Alberto Manguel (editor) (on television in the future according to Bradbury in Fahrenheit 451, and how it's somewhat come true, Terence M. Green (on children raised on TV and creating a video literate world), Bruce Sterling (on what he thinks of TV and his 1991 view of future of TV, and Virtual Reality), Douglas Adams (about Virtual Reality and using it to save the world, and creating virtual reality IN reality). Candace Jane Dorsey (on a baseball story on Mars in a collection she edits), Mark Chiarello (on baseball's imagery, and drawing a baseball card collection on the Negro League), Todd McFarlane (on how Spider-Man hangs out when not working), Walt Simonson (on how Thor spends his leisure time)
Part Three: Neil Gaiman (on how Miracle Man recharges), Louise Simonson (on Superhuman not having any leisure time, except for being Clark Kent), Ty Templeton (on his theory on how Superman kicks back), a clip of Superman Song by the Crash Test Dummies, Fabian Nicieza (on whether he'll show Alpha Flight in their leisure time, and what leisure time says about us), Steve Bissett (on the 24 Hour Comic, as a sort of 'game' for comic creators, and other games of artists (the surreal corpse)).

Censorship - October 25, 1990
Part One: Comics facing obsenity charges. Interviews with Harlan Ellison (on the good messages in a lot of SF), Kevin Eastman (on how his characterss influenced a kid to hurt himself), Harlan Ellison (on how the censors are exposed to the 'corrupting material' constantly, and standing up to censors), Steve Bissett (on the Comic Code Authority and the congressional hearings that led to it), Frank Miller (on him feeling relatively free from censorship lately), Steve Bissett (on temporarily dropping the comic code for the Spidey drug issue, and Swamp Thing deciding to do away with the CCA permanently)
Part Two: Spider and Jeanne Robinson (on the problems with censorship of sex in SF, and a particular unsavory reference that an author slipped past the censors), Jack Vance (on some of the censorship he faced), Spider Robinson (on Callahan's Lady, taking place in a brothel, and not being get the stories in the same magazine as the rest of the Callahan stories), Jack Vance (on the basic choices of censorship), Maryanne Neilsen (on whether, as an editor, she's a censor), David Lloyd (on creative choice to leave our detailed of violence and sex in V for Vendetta), Denys Cowan (on being uncomfortable with drawing a lynching scene)
Part Three: Elaine Lee (on handling violence in Starstruck), Elaine Lee and Charles Vess (on a particular censorship blowup around a comic back-up story about a young witch that includes her first period, when the first story had so much violence), Harlan Ellison (about the comic Taboo, and how art should unsettle you), Clive Barker (on worrying about a backlash, another Dr. Werthem).

Next week: Utopia, Ecology, and Advice for wannabe creators.

Now that that's out of the way, TV wrapup for the week. Doctor Who... well, I've met Adric. For some reason, in my head, I always pictured him older, from the name. Seems nice enough so far, although probably not one of my favorites. Only a few episodes left before I can say goodbye to Four and get to Five.

What premiered this week? House... it was okay, but I thought it dragged on too long focusing on House, and I wanted to see the others. And the ending annoyed me. (spoilers) Read more... )

Heroes also premiered and... well, I suppose, objectively speaking, it's probably a little better than last year. But it's still hard to watch and take seriously. The Trust has not just been lost, it's been thoroughly shattered and the pieces each taken on a separate boat ride in a different ocean by a different man who dumps it into the ocean at some random time not in sight of land. It's hard to take anything seriously after the stuff they pulled last year, because there's the feeling at at any moment, they could decide to ignore some plot point they've already established. Slightly more spoilery behind cut Read more... )

Dollhouse also premiered, and it wasn't bad, although they seem to be slightly unskeevying one of the characters at the expense of extra-skeevying one of the relatively unskeevy ones. We'll see how it goes, though, the revelations towards the end could be interesting to go on.

FlashForward... it's okay. Needs time to find it's footing to judge for sure. Not sure the premise really works as a basis for a series, but it's got my attention for a few episodes at least.

Fringe: Okay... the second episode of the second season of X-Files was about a genetic mutant Flukeman. Is it just some wacky coincidence or intentional homage that the Second episode of Fringe's Second Season feels like almost the same thing, only, you know, less interesting (because Fringe is mostly a less interesting version of X-files)?

Otherwise, not much. This week: Stargate Universe, the last thing for... oh, about a month or so probably that I'm looking forward to.

Birthday!

Sep. 27th, 2009 09:33 am
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
Happy Birthday [livejournal.com profile] greektoomey!
newnumber6: (rotating2)
Start with ze Book Foo.

Finished: Battle Royale, by Koushun Takami (reread)
Started: The Science Fiction Century, Vol 1, by assorted (short story collection)

I've read BR several times so there's not much new to say. However, there are a couple things I want to comment on in terms of the plot, compared to what I might have expected. Spoilers, of course.
Read more... )

Finished: A Fire Upon the Deep, by Vernor Vinge (reread)
Started: Nineteen Eighty-Four, by George Orwell (reread)

Not much to say about A Fire Upon the Deep. Really liked it, as usual. No particular added payoff in reading the series in chronological order as opposed to publication order, so I'll probably go with the usual next time. Key phrases: hexapodia as the key insight

A post on 1984 by [livejournal.com profile] karenjeane reminded me that I hadn't read the book in a while, and since I needed something to read, well, it seemed like a perfect choice. Odd that I've been reading a bunch of books with a 'totalitarian government' theme lately, though... Battle Royale, A Deepness in the Sky (sorta, with the badguys), 1984.


In other news, I got a nice little ego boost yesterday. You know this icon? (assuming you're not reading a really old entry and I've rotated it out since). Well, I made it from a larger page-edit I did in Photoshop using that particular gag. I made it something like a year ago, for the old scans_daily community (and probably one of the last Photoshops I've done, I haven't even made many icons since the community was shut down). But yesterday? Someone posted it to a 'funny images' thread on the (revived) Ships and Giggles forum. When I revealed I did it, the poster told me that Matt Fraction, current writer on the Iron Man comic, just tweeted about it. Text was:
"This IRON MAN/DR. HORRIBLE mashup has delighted Team IRON MAN to no end: http://tinyurl.com/yckhmxo (thanks Cth. anybody know who made it?)"

I used my rarely used twitter (http://twitter.com/starpilotsix)to let him know I was responsible in case you were wondering. So yeah, like I said, nice little ego boost there. :)

Wednesday.

Sep. 23rd, 2009 05:09 pm
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
No comics of course, which has become the norm rather than the exception. Seems almost silly to keep posting on Wednesdays regardless, but I'm a creature of habits.

Anyway, work was okay, a little muggy.

I also had to kill a wasp today. I say had to because it's generally not my choice. Wasps are one of the 'bugs' that I always have a kind of fascination with. There aren't many. Wasps, to a lesser extent Bees, Spiders, Praying Mantis, and to a much lesser extent, ants. None of them I want _on me_, but I like observing them. Wasps I actually tolerate most of all, which is kind of bizarre considering they've got that built in sting. But I have no problem letting a wasp buzz right around my face or even landing on me. I don't brush it off. When I was young, probably 12 or so, there was a summer with a lot of wasps, and in one particular day I got stung about 5 times in five separate incidents. One was outside, then later that day I'd be somewhere inside, lifting up a book and a wasp happened to be under it, etc. After that though I seemed to have lost all my fear of them. I almost consider them friends (though really it's more of a scientific respect for their form and function combined with a bizarre aesthetic appeal). I've been stung a few times since (almost always because I didn't know one was there and happened to swat at the 'something' I felt on me), but I don't even mind that.

But alas, some things take priority over that, because the wasp-killing was at the request of girls who were freaked out by wasps, and I can't refuse that. It was in the staff room, and the way it was set up it would have been hard to shoo it away without taking the chance of shooing it into an area with even more people. If I could have managed it I might have tried to catch it in my hands and carry it outside, even risking a sting, but it was hovering about the lights and the only way to reach it was with a newspaper. And, when I smacked it to the ground, at that point, it was probably just kinder to finish the job, which I did with a murmured apology of, "sorry little buddy."

Otherwise, not much happened today. Took a nap after work but it was annoying because although I dreamed, my eyes kept opening, which is a very frustrating experience. You can't see the dream because the image of a tiny fragment of comforter or bedspread is superimposed over it, and I can't manage to consciously close my eyes, or move my body because sleep paralysis has set in.

Finished the last two books I was reading but I need to choose replacements before I do a full Book Foo post.
newnumber6: (lasers)
First up, Violence. Guess I was wrong about Brian Stableford being on this one. I know he was on one talking about it, maybe it was a special pacifism episode. Alas. Oh well.

Violence: March 7, 1991
The role of violence in comics and SF. Bit of a poor video/audio quality unfortunately, but not horrible-bad.

Part One: Todd McFarlane (complaining about parents complaining about too much violence nowadays), Ty Templeton (on why comics are full of violence), Walt Simonson (on the type of violence in his comics), Neil Gaiman (on how superhero comics portray an attractive portrait of violence, and taking out subtext and philosophy and such to write Batman), Bill Sienkiewicz (on his views of violence in comics and how it contrasts to the real world), Ty Templeton again (on why superhero comics dominate the form)
Part Two: Steve Bissett (on how the violence in Swamp Thing was different than most superhero comics), Lewis Shiner (on avoiding glorifying violence in fiction), Terry Beatty (on the violence in Ms. Tree and how he tries to emphasize the consequences), Peter Straub (on "the only way to understand violence is to wrap it in imagination", and whether he fears he's glorifying violence), Walter Hill (director of Warriors, Aliens 3, on how drama depends on violence
Part Three: Fantasy author Charles de Lint (on how he handles violence in his stories), SF author Jack Womack (on why he uses violence in his work), S.M. Stirling and Shirley Meier (on their novel the Cage and how much violence is in it, and how they approach violence), Lewis Shiner (on how first hand experience with violence changes people, and the attitudes that lead to violence), Neil Gaiman (on Punch and Judy).

Behind the cut: three old, not terribly good, from the first season, before it found its groove, eps, one focusing on some miscellaneous comics and anime, a Star Wars: TOS focused ep, and another Miscellaneous ep focusing a bit more on Dystopian visions)
Read more... )

And sticking with old TV, just finished Meglos, which means I'm almost done with the Fourth Doctor. Next ep I believe introduces a new companion, Adric, one of the ones I've never seen anything of. Edit: And wow, I totally did not notice, until reading the wiki for the episode, that the religious leader was played by Jacquelline Hill, who played Barbara, one of the first batch of Companions).

More modern TVwise, Supernatural was okay, with a couple eye-rolling moments. Only really new thing was Frige. And Man, I'd forgotten how much that show bored me! Well, okay, that's a little harsh, but I keep wanting the show to be so much better. And it looked towards the end of last season it was picking up, but it took a bit of a step back with this episode.

Next week, though, things really ramp up. The two hour premiere of House, 2 hour premiere of Heroes (yeah, still watching, more out of masochism and lack of TV channels than anything else), Dollhouse, and I believe Flash Forward gets its premiere.

Birthday!

Sep. 18th, 2009 10:25 am
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
Happy Birthday [livejournal.com profile] shadow_weaver!!!

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