newnumber6: (lasers)
Continued from last post. First post of this whole series is here, for explanation purposes.

Before, I continue, a few comments on the last part that LJ didn't let me post cause it was too long:
Read more... )

And on to the new:Read more... )

Comments always welcome.
newnumber6: (otp)
This is year 3 of my Runaways Alternate Volume 3. See that post for explanations of what this is all about. Last chunk is here. A bit rushed due to trying to get it out before NaNo month, so excuse typos.
Read more... )
Here's a good time to break, since LJ won't let me post stuff too long.
Next Post, issues #31 to #36, back to the main plot of the year.

PerExWriMo

Nov. 1st, 2009 05:58 pm
newnumber6: (comics)
So, it's November, the National Novel Writing Month. Like in most previous years, I'm not doing it as expected. However, I am doing another Personal Extra Writing Month, with the goal of reaching 50,000 words, just spread about amongst various short story projects. And I've already done 2000 for today, so I'm off to a good start (even if the story I was writing is probably unsalvagable without a complete rewrite).

The truth is, however, this isn't just a Personal Extra Writing Month, it's more of a KickStart month. See, I haven't posted about this, but for the last few months I've slacked off and haven't done any of my forced writing. Which isn't to say I haven't written, it's just either been dribs and drabs when the mood struck me, or on projects I don't count. But still, not as much as I wouldn't. There's many reasons for this, but most boil down to that I've been depressed, discouraged, and lacking new ideas and drive, and for the few months before I quit the metered writing, I was just chugging along without much drive, churning it out without getting any new ideas I wanted to work on. I thought maybe a break to refresh myself might help. And to a certain extent, it has. I've had a few new story ideas in the time off. I've identified a couple of the timesinks that I think hurt me in writing, and tried to cut them out of my routine. So, I'll do PerExWriMo to try to get myself back in gear (although I'll be taking off December as usual because Christmas month is just a pain all around with too much stuff on my mind), and hopefully start fully writing again my normal way in 2010, and also submitting stories again and start the whole rejection cycle. Anyway, crossed fingers.

Anyway, one of the writing things that "doesn't count" but has taken up some of my time and writing urges, are my Runaways alternate Vol 3 outlines. And, anticipating November, I finished up Year 3. I'll be posting it next, I think. I know, most of you don't care, it's basically unformed fanfic, but it does entertain ME (sadly, more than actual comics have in some time).

In other news, well, V starts this week. I don't have high hopes, but I'll watch. I'm still liking Stargate Universe... hasn't found its legs yet, but I like it well enough that it's probably my favorite show currently on (which really says more about the lack of quality shows on now than SGU). Heroes is interesting if you can completely ignore that they're still completely ignoring their own past (a couple weeks ago Peter sought out HRG to see if he knew a Healer. While his daughter was there. You know, the one who's blood healed him from a bullet to the head? But nobody seems to remember that). Enough to keep watching it. Other shows aren't really even worth much of a mention.

I've kept watching Classic Who, actually, instead of cutting it off, just because timing worked out that way, had new eps finish d/l when I had downtime and nothing to watch. Only about 4 or so stories left in Davison's run. I'll give a more complete rundown on my thoughts when I'm finished, but I'm actually enjoying the series more than I have in a while, somewhere around the end of 4 the writing took a big jump up in quality and inventiveness.
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
Since I only get one comic book a month now, that's what I got:

New Mutants #6 (not bad for a 'heroes returning from the dead' crossover plot)

Full reviews as usual at my comic reviews site for anyone interested.

Also picked up at the used bookstore (for only 50 cents!): Year's Best SF #9 (short story collection).
Pretty sure I don't have that one, stories in it by Doctorow and Stross among others, should be worth a look. And even if it WAS a rebuy, hey, 50 cents!

Work was okay, although they showed up earlier than I did, so a lot of work awas done for me. Which is good, I guess, since I still get paid the same amount, but I still feel bad. Ah well.

On the way to the comic store I noticed a building was owned by the "WTF Group". WTF? Anyway, drizzly the whole day so I didn't get any reading while walking done either. :P. Ah well.
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
This week I got two books:

New Mutants #5 (quieter issue, enjoyable, but with weird art)
Runaways #14 (sooo disappointing. What happened to you, Runaways? You used to be cool.)

Full reviews as usual at my comic reviews site for anyone interested.

Work was okay. I must have left late or got caught in a time warp or something because the truck was there (very slightly) before me but arrived about the same time as usual. Had to do a bit of extra work (for extra money) helping out with some other stuff too, but that's not a big deal.

And it was the first time since before summer began that I had to wear my jacket to feel comfortable (well, technically, on Monday it probably would have helped... the temperature wasn't the issue, but I didn't check the weather before I left for work and it started pouring during work and I had to walk home for an hour with no umbrella wearing only jeans and a thin white t-shirt). I probably coulda gone without it but it woulda been chilly.

TV and PoG

Sep. 27th, 2009 10:10 am
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
Prisoners of Gravity links first:

Women
Women in SF, Fantasy, and Comics

Part One: Trina Robbins (on how she first got hooked on comics), June Brigman (on why women don't get into comics, and trying to change it using Barbie comics), Louise Simonson (on lack of things in conventional superhero comics for women to relate to), Kate Worley of Omaha, the Cat Dancer (on whether she's bothered by being in one of the few prominent female comics creators), Elaine Lee (on the difficulty of breaking into comics and the 'boys club'), Chris Claremont (on why he was renowned for good female characters and how it became a cliche for him)
Part Two: Steve Bissett (on why comics are so slow to recognize women, and some of the key roles women played in comics). Shift of focus to SF. Lois McMaster Bujold (on whether SF is a good platform for a treatment of women's issues, and her most 'feminist' book), Veronica Hollinger (professor on SF) (on who are the landmark female figures in SF and male writers who are most 'feminist'), Candace Jane Dorsey (on leaving out gender pronouns in her stories), Pamela Argent (on 'strong female characters' who are just men in women bodies), Gregory Benford (on the tension between the sexes as being a good thing and some of the difficulties on juggling everything in SF compared to toher fields)
Part Three: Leona Gom (on creating a 'last man' in an all female world), a story about James Tiptree Jr. (actually a woman under a pen name) being asked to leave a summit on feminism in SF. Lois McMaster Bujold (on if there are difficulties in writing male viewpoints). Switch in focus to Fantasy: Karen Wehrstein (on her own challenges in writing women characters), Tanya Huff (on whether fantasy has improved in terms of the women, and info about something she changed about her own work on realizing it was somewhat sexist), Terence M. Green (on how men and women are different), Trina Robbins (on the complaint about things that interest women being 'banal')

Leisure - May 2, 1991
How we will spend out leisure time in the future, according to SF
Part One: Lois McMaster Bujold (on mandatory zero-gee workouts and the physiological adaptations of zero-g), Andrew Weiner (on some of his leisure-centered short stories, in particular one about filling time in a permanent unemployment), Christopher Hinz (on the idea of recreational space colonies), Jack Womack (on leisure time, or lack thereof, in his Draco books), Gregord Benford (on the management of leisure, and passive leisure), William Gibson (on dismissing 'television' as 'empty calories' leisure, and the mystery of TV and media and what it's doing to us)
Part Two: Alberto Manguel (editor) (on television in the future according to Bradbury in Fahrenheit 451, and how it's somewhat come true, Terence M. Green (on children raised on TV and creating a video literate world), Bruce Sterling (on what he thinks of TV and his 1991 view of future of TV, and Virtual Reality), Douglas Adams (about Virtual Reality and using it to save the world, and creating virtual reality IN reality). Candace Jane Dorsey (on a baseball story on Mars in a collection she edits), Mark Chiarello (on baseball's imagery, and drawing a baseball card collection on the Negro League), Todd McFarlane (on how Spider-Man hangs out when not working), Walt Simonson (on how Thor spends his leisure time)
Part Three: Neil Gaiman (on how Miracle Man recharges), Louise Simonson (on Superhuman not having any leisure time, except for being Clark Kent), Ty Templeton (on his theory on how Superman kicks back), a clip of Superman Song by the Crash Test Dummies, Fabian Nicieza (on whether he'll show Alpha Flight in their leisure time, and what leisure time says about us), Steve Bissett (on the 24 Hour Comic, as a sort of 'game' for comic creators, and other games of artists (the surreal corpse)).

Censorship - October 25, 1990
Part One: Comics facing obsenity charges. Interviews with Harlan Ellison (on the good messages in a lot of SF), Kevin Eastman (on how his characterss influenced a kid to hurt himself), Harlan Ellison (on how the censors are exposed to the 'corrupting material' constantly, and standing up to censors), Steve Bissett (on the Comic Code Authority and the congressional hearings that led to it), Frank Miller (on him feeling relatively free from censorship lately), Steve Bissett (on temporarily dropping the comic code for the Spidey drug issue, and Swamp Thing deciding to do away with the CCA permanently)
Part Two: Spider and Jeanne Robinson (on the problems with censorship of sex in SF, and a particular unsavory reference that an author slipped past the censors), Jack Vance (on some of the censorship he faced), Spider Robinson (on Callahan's Lady, taking place in a brothel, and not being get the stories in the same magazine as the rest of the Callahan stories), Jack Vance (on the basic choices of censorship), Maryanne Neilsen (on whether, as an editor, she's a censor), David Lloyd (on creative choice to leave our detailed of violence and sex in V for Vendetta), Denys Cowan (on being uncomfortable with drawing a lynching scene)
Part Three: Elaine Lee (on handling violence in Starstruck), Elaine Lee and Charles Vess (on a particular censorship blowup around a comic back-up story about a young witch that includes her first period, when the first story had so much violence), Harlan Ellison (about the comic Taboo, and how art should unsettle you), Clive Barker (on worrying about a backlash, another Dr. Werthem).

Next week: Utopia, Ecology, and Advice for wannabe creators.

Now that that's out of the way, TV wrapup for the week. Doctor Who... well, I've met Adric. For some reason, in my head, I always pictured him older, from the name. Seems nice enough so far, although probably not one of my favorites. Only a few episodes left before I can say goodbye to Four and get to Five.

What premiered this week? House... it was okay, but I thought it dragged on too long focusing on House, and I wanted to see the others. And the ending annoyed me. (spoilers) Read more... )

Heroes also premiered and... well, I suppose, objectively speaking, it's probably a little better than last year. But it's still hard to watch and take seriously. The Trust has not just been lost, it's been thoroughly shattered and the pieces each taken on a separate boat ride in a different ocean by a different man who dumps it into the ocean at some random time not in sight of land. It's hard to take anything seriously after the stuff they pulled last year, because there's the feeling at at any moment, they could decide to ignore some plot point they've already established. Slightly more spoilery behind cut Read more... )

Dollhouse also premiered, and it wasn't bad, although they seem to be slightly unskeevying one of the characters at the expense of extra-skeevying one of the relatively unskeevy ones. We'll see how it goes, though, the revelations towards the end could be interesting to go on.

FlashForward... it's okay. Needs time to find it's footing to judge for sure. Not sure the premise really works as a basis for a series, but it's got my attention for a few episodes at least.

Fringe: Okay... the second episode of the second season of X-Files was about a genetic mutant Flukeman. Is it just some wacky coincidence or intentional homage that the Second episode of Fringe's Second Season feels like almost the same thing, only, you know, less interesting (because Fringe is mostly a less interesting version of X-files)?

Otherwise, not much. This week: Stargate Universe, the last thing for... oh, about a month or so probably that I'm looking forward to.
newnumber6: (lasers)
First up, Violence. Guess I was wrong about Brian Stableford being on this one. I know he was on one talking about it, maybe it was a special pacifism episode. Alas. Oh well.

Violence: March 7, 1991
The role of violence in comics and SF. Bit of a poor video/audio quality unfortunately, but not horrible-bad.

Part One: Todd McFarlane (complaining about parents complaining about too much violence nowadays), Ty Templeton (on why comics are full of violence), Walt Simonson (on the type of violence in his comics), Neil Gaiman (on how superhero comics portray an attractive portrait of violence, and taking out subtext and philosophy and such to write Batman), Bill Sienkiewicz (on his views of violence in comics and how it contrasts to the real world), Ty Templeton again (on why superhero comics dominate the form)
Part Two: Steve Bissett (on how the violence in Swamp Thing was different than most superhero comics), Lewis Shiner (on avoiding glorifying violence in fiction), Terry Beatty (on the violence in Ms. Tree and how he tries to emphasize the consequences), Peter Straub (on "the only way to understand violence is to wrap it in imagination", and whether he fears he's glorifying violence), Walter Hill (director of Warriors, Aliens 3, on how drama depends on violence
Part Three: Fantasy author Charles de Lint (on how he handles violence in his stories), SF author Jack Womack (on why he uses violence in his work), S.M. Stirling and Shirley Meier (on their novel the Cage and how much violence is in it, and how they approach violence), Lewis Shiner (on how first hand experience with violence changes people, and the attitudes that lead to violence), Neil Gaiman (on Punch and Judy).

Behind the cut: three old, not terribly good, from the first season, before it found its groove, eps, one focusing on some miscellaneous comics and anime, a Star Wars: TOS focused ep, and another Miscellaneous ep focusing a bit more on Dystopian visions)
Read more... )

And sticking with old TV, just finished Meglos, which means I'm almost done with the Fourth Doctor. Next ep I believe introduces a new companion, Adric, one of the ones I've never seen anything of. Edit: And wow, I totally did not notice, until reading the wiki for the episode, that the religious leader was played by Jacquelline Hill, who played Barbara, one of the first batch of Companions).

More modern TVwise, Supernatural was okay, with a couple eye-rolling moments. Only really new thing was Frige. And Man, I'd forgotten how much that show bored me! Well, okay, that's a little harsh, but I keep wanting the show to be so much better. And it looked towards the end of last season it was picking up, but it took a bit of a step back with this episode.

Next week, though, things really ramp up. The two hour premiere of House, 2 hour premiere of Heroes (yeah, still watching, more out of masochism and lack of TV channels than anything else), Dollhouse, and I believe Flash Forward gets its premiere.
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
First up,
Form (March 22nd, 1991)
Discussions on the various forms, novella vs short story, trilogy vs series, in comics and speculative fiction.

Part One: Short Stories: Dave Duncan (on why he thinks SF works best in short stories), Crawford Kilian (on the short story as 'training ground' and area of experimentation), Jim Baen (on the strength of short stories/novellas in SF), Marianne Nelson (on why if you want to get into SF you should start with short stories). Novella/Novellette: Judith Merril (on why the Novella's almost unique to SF), a bit of history. The Serial: Neil Gaiman (on the problems and advantages of writing serial fiction, like his comic the Sandman, and the "Is Little Nell Dead Yet" phenomenon), Chris Claremont (differences on writing a novel and writing an ongoing series, and the why the book and the audience don't have to keep going together)
Part Two: Neil Gaiman (on benefits of writing Good Omens, compared to comic writing). Alternative Comics: Black and White. Gilbert Hernandez (on why Love and Rockets is Black and White), Ty Templeton (on why he enjoys black and white), Kevin Eastman (on problems he encountered in getting Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles published). Novels: Jim Baen (on the benefits of the novel in SF). The Trilogy (and other variations): Guy Gavriel Kay (on the mundane reasons the trilogy has become a standard form in fantasy fiction, on the danger of writers going back to the well), Tanya Huff (on writing a Duology, and the repeated questions about the third book despite the (big spoilers)), a bit of a clip from Misery, Tanya Huff again (on why trilogy and series are so popular), George Zebrowski (on the problems of writing long term series fiction and how they're not artistic)
Part Three: The Graphic Novel: David Lloyd (artist on on V for Vendetta, and whether it benefitted from being repackaged as a Graphic novel), Will Eisner (on why he left serial comics for the Graphic Novel, and pioneering the form with A Contract With God). Conclusion: Dan Piraro (Bizarro, experimenting with animation based on his cartoon panels)

Chaos: (March 14th, 1991)
Chaos theory. A bit more heavy on the science (popularist science reporting that is), side with only a bit of discussion on its use in art/fiction/SF.

Part One James Gleick (explaining Chaos Theory itself, Fractals, the Butterfly Effect and why it took so long to reach the public consciousness), Caleb Howard (computer hacker, on impact of fractals on computer animation)
Part Two: CGi short film Panspermia, Jeff Evans (on sterility and unnatural perfection in computer graphics being corrected by fractals and chaos theory), James Gleick (on the fractalness of Ferns, and to be wary of the human tendency to pattern-recognize). Here's the slow switching over to Chaos theory in art and fiction: Bill Sienkiewicz (on using Fractals in Big Numbers, with Alan Moore, theological/philosophical implications on chaos theory and fractals), Jeff Evans (on that last topic), James Gleick (on misunderstanding of theory in general to extend to social/philosophical problems), the host talks about the tendency of SF writers to misunderstand science or to just use it as gobledegook to base their stories around
Part Three: George Zebrowski (on his reaction to James Gleick book about Chaos Theory), Garfield Reeve-Stevens (on his reaction to the book, and whether he plans to use Chaos theory in his work), Gregory Benford (on using Chaos Theory in SF), Douglas Adams (on his reaction after reading Chaos on how everything seems to fit in with it), James Gleick (on the idea catching fire in the culture at large).

Fear: October 31, 1991

Horror, the use of Fear itself as a theme in fiction, and what scares creators

Part One: Archie Goodwin (on role of fear in storytelling, the "safe scare", Stephen Jones (horror anthologist on the two basic emotions being Fear and Love, and how the best stories combine both, and the best use of fear he's read, the "show or don't show the monster" debate), Tanya Huff (on why we like to be scared, fear being like sex). Some examples of SF that uses Fear in them. Bob Shaw (on why he's so intrigued by fear, and his own phobia, and science as 'pushing away darkness to make us feel better')Part Two: Louis Shiner (on his use of Tesla and his phobias in his story White City), Brian Stableford (on why Fear's begun to play such a large role in his work, particularly his vampire novel the Empire of Fear, the current popularity of Horror, a nice scientific look at the connection between fear and arousal), Neil Gaiman (the role of Fear in Sandman, the difference between Fear and Horror), Pete Milligan and Grant Morrison (on exploring Fear and Dread in their comics, fear as dislocating the mind and the startings of religion)
Part Three: Clive Barker (on different types of fears, and all his personal fears, and why he's using less fear in his book Imajica, and how he doesn't think his early stories really evoked fear, or why fear's not especially interesting on its own, on what medium fear works best in), Jeff Ryman (and the role of Fear in the Wizard of Oz, fear as social control)

And Profiles, an episode where he profiles 3 specific creators, Daniel Clowes (independent comic 8Ball), Peter Straub (horror author), and Marv Newland (animator), but none of them especially interest me so no detailed breakdown (however, Part 2 does contain the complete short film "Bambi Meets Godzilla", done by Newland, and the third part is mostly Straub talking about horror so it works as a nice companion to the Fear ep).
Part One Part Two Part Three

Looking forward to next week, Violence, which I believe has interview bits with Brian Stableford about his pacifist space opera hero, Star Pilot Grainger, the first time I've seen it since I actually read (and loved) the books. PoG was one of the reasons for me trying them, too.

In other news, been having a bit of headaches lately, think it's probably eye strain. Which is annoying, cause I only have one left working and so many things I enjoy doing involve using it. Need perfect cyber-eyes to get invented now. And to become rich and handsome, and not at all socially awkward, so long as I'm dreaming.

TVwise... Glee's 2nd episode wasn't bad, not quite as fun as the first, but okay. Supernatural had its premiere, and, well, it was okay, a few fun bits, a few meh bits, but Bobby is awesome as usual.

Been watching old school Who as usual. I'll probably finish Four's run and then take a break for a while. Not because I specifically want to, but once regular TV starts up again I find I have less time for it since I have more I need to download (often legally, thanks to TV channel websites) that I missed during the regular week. I can pick up with Five in the summer or during the rerun-gaps that crop up every once in a while in the regular season. Just finished Shada, and the season's been reasonably fun. Think the Nightmare of Eden was one of my favorites of the recent batch. As for the big "Which Romana is better" debate? Right now I'm still putting them about even. I don't have a particular preference one way or the other. II has a slightly more friendly chemistry with the Doctor, true, but I kind of liked the slight standoffishness of I. So, again, they're about even, just II had a longer time to shine and slightly better stories, I think, but that's not the actress' fault so I can hardly hold it against that version.
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
That time again...

Februray 14th, 1991 - Projects: (Highlighting a few specific projects by creators in SF, Fantasy, and Comics, in 1991)

Part One: Interviews with Todd McFarlane (on changing the look of Spider-Man and how he writes), Charles Vess (on a Spider-Man story and illustrating a Sandman story about A Midsummer Night's Dream), Neil Gaiman (plans for the Sandman story Seasons of Mists and how he uses overly long chapter titles), George Pratt (on Enemy Ace and using it to make a statement on Vietnam),
Part Two: Interview with Will Eisner (on To The Heart of the Storm), bit of a rant on how SF and comics are disrespected in culture, Interviews with Frank Miller (on Elektra Lives Again and how Lynn Varley's coloring made some big differences), Jack Womack (on the Draco Corporation novels, specifically the 4th novel, Elvissey and the last books), Fabian Nicieza (on editing Barbie comics)
Part Three: Interview with Neil Gaiman (on The Books of Magic), a bit of 'cartoons for adults' but this ep cuts off abruptly before the interview with the creator.

Sci-Fi's True North (February 12, 1990)

Early ep (overuse of cheesy effects, longer interviews on more wide ranging topics), on the Canadian Identity in SF. Kind of a lame ep too.

Part One: Interviews With Lorna Toolis (on Toronto's library SF collection, on whether there's a Canadian style in SF, themes that crop up a lot in Canadian SF compared to US, top Canadian Writers, the Tesseracts collection (of Canadian SF), various magazines and the Canadian SF community), communications with other SF libraries)
Part Two: Bernie Finklestein (Rock & Roll guy and SF fan, on his earliest SF memories, the intersection of Rock & Roll and SF, the 50s paranoia about nuclear annihilation)
Part Three: Kent Burles (Canadian
comic artist, on his Planet of the Apes project, how he works with an American writer long-distance), Dave Ross (Canadian artist, about drawing Wolverine, problems with being a Canadian artist working in an American field, missing deadlines), viewer mail

Will Eisner and the Spirit - October 18th, 1990.
50th anniversary of the Spirit. Just links here, no summaries, because although I respect his contributions, I'm just not personally terribly interested in an ep all about him and the Spirit.

Part One Part Two Part Three

M-Space: Moebius and Merril, Spotlight on comic creator Moebius and SF Author Judith Merril, December 13th, 1990)
Part One: Mail, Interviews with Frank Miller (on Moebius' work), Jean Giraud (Moebius himself, on why he chose to work in comics, how he got started with drawing, why he still does it), Steve Leialoha (on why he likes Moebius' work), Moebius (on his collaborationals with filmmaker Alexandro Jodorowsky), Sergio Aragones (on Jodorowsky), Steve Bissette (on Moebius and Jodorowsky's comic colaboration Eyes of the Cat)
Part Two: Moebius (on The Incal, how he got into Science Fiction, Trina Robbins (raving about Moebius and why they have small audiences), Moebius (on how he sees himself). Switch in topic to Merril. Interviews with Judith Merrill (on how she got into writing Science Fiction, nice story about Ted (Theordore Sturgeon?)convinced her to try writing Science Fiction), Guy Gavriel Kay (on Merril's importance in improving the quality of the actual writing in science fiction), Merril (on being one of the very few women writers over her time, on her derivative novels she co-wrote super quickly, that became the most popular thing she's written)
Part Three: Merril's influence on an editor, introducing the New Wave, Interviews with Merril (on producing an anthology, producing Tesseracts Canadian SF anthology, why she left the US permanently for Canada during the Vietnam War, the Roshdale experiment, bringing her huge SF collection with her and so starting the Spaced Out Library, the SF Library in Toronto (now known as the Merril Collection))

(Next week's should be better, Form, Chaos, and Fear)


---

Now that that's done, what else is new? Long weekend technically, but not for me, cause I still work. But yay, extra money. And yay for September, because it means the dry season for TV is nearing a close. I think most things I watch or am interesting in starting to watch start NEXT week, but there's a trickle here and there.

So far there's just one show that's hit my attention index, and it's a bit of a surprising one. Glee. Apparently it aired the first ep last year after American Idol, but since I don't care about that I never even heard about it, and just saw commercials and, last Wednesday, when it was on and nothing else was, decided to give it a try. ANd, y'know, I liked it. Which is odd, because I don't listen to music, so that it's set around a new Glee Club full of social rejects doing musical numbers doesn't do anything for me. And the show is a bit predictable and obvious in some ways. But it's also had a bit of a quirkyness to it that I liked. I think I like it in part because it hits on a couple of my squeepoints (like squickpoints, but opposite). (more behind cut). Read more... ) I'm not 100% sold on it, but I liked it enough to give it a couple episodes to try out.
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
February 28, 1991 - Marketing & Merchandising.

Not an especially interesting episode to me, but for completeness' sake, and there's a bit of interest here.

Part One: Spider and Jeanne Robinson on Marketing of SF and what audience to target, Jack Vance on how Dune had trouble getting published and how it gained its appeal and sequels, Spider Robinson on an autograph session and a particularly stupid distributor, Guy Gavriel Kay on the prevelance of fantasy and its commercial success and how success attracts hacks, Jim Baen on the crowded marketplace and the sales life-cycles of books, Terry Brooks on how he explains his sales.
Part Two: George R. R. Martin on whether he considers himself a "science fiction" writer and the difficulty of marketting writers who don't fit into boxes, Peter Straub on readers expectations of writers can cause problems, Bob Kane on the Batman marketting machine growing from the 80s movie, and the danger of overexposure, Kevin Eastman on the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and how marketting made it a megabrand, James L. Brooks on the merchandising of the Simpsons, Sam Simon on whether think the merchandising is overwhelming the show
Part Three: Matt Groening on why the Simpsons show itself is popular, Fabian Nicieza on marketting of concepts and why certain comics (Todd McFarlane) get super marketting gimmicks). Bill Marks on the marketting of Todd McFarlane's Spider-Man and his invention of sealed bagged comics, and marketting to try to direct people to the good, and stangnation of the comic industry and trying to diversify the industry (in 1991)


April 11, 1991 - Villains in SF, comics, and fantasy:
Part One: General introduction and a quote about Villains by Mary Wollstoncraft, Comics first. Interviews with Max Allan Collins (on Dick Tracy's Villains), Montage of comic creators on what makes good villains and favorite villains (Archie Goodwin, Louise Simonson, Mike Mignola), Fabian Nicieza (on what makes a good supervillain and well-motivated villains, the remotivating of Lex Luthor), Gregory Benford (If the 'idea' in a SF novel is the hero, what's the villain), Nancy Kress (on creating villains in SF with complexity)
Part Two: Jack Womack (on the lack of real villains in his Draco books), Charles de Lint (on what makes a great fantasy villain), Tanya Huff (same topic), Ty Templeton (on favorite comic book villain, Luthor, and why, and also on how the Joker complements Batman so well), Kate Worley (on the lack of individual villains in Omaha, the Cat Dancer as opposed to corporate or systemized evil)
Part Three: Steve Bissett (on the more recent nuanced view of evil in comics, and his feelings on what caused it for him - Watergate), Neil Gaiman (the problem of villains, and how they're just people, with good and bad in them), and moving on to the Serial Killer as the last bastion of pure evil, with Peter Straub (on the fascination with serial killers in fiction compared with the almost mundanity of the real facts of them), Garfield Reeve-Stevens (on the power and appeal of the Joker)

January 31, 1991 - Voice/American Artform

Whether comic books and SF are international artforms or there's a strong 'American' voice to them, and a look at some other country voices.
Part One: Some extended jokes about a Canadian-voice Star Trek, Interviews with Nancy Kress (on how classic SF started as British, even if they weren't always marketted as SF, whereas American SF was ghettoized), Candas Jane Dorsey (on the origins of US SF and being extremely formulaic, and various phases of SF), Gregory Benford (on the US not being great on the traditional forms, and how the strength was in their 'invented' genres, and why good SF elsewhere in the world isn't widely popular), Jim Baen (whether there's still an American voice in SF, and what it is, and how the experience of Vietnam altered American SF's voice),

Part Two: Nancy Kress (on one of the persistant theme of American SF), Jean Giraud/Moebius (on whether SF is an American form, or an English-language form, and the differences in his (French) outlook and how it influences his work, and whether he feels comics are an American artform or European), Harlan Ellison (on comic books as one of the 5 native US artforms even though it's exploded wildly elsewhere), Will Eisner (on greater respect in Europe for comic artists than in the US), Denys Cowan (the view of American comics, in America, as 'trash'), Bill Sienkiewicz (on the new energy of comics in US and England, in the early 90s), Chester Brown (on his Canadian autobiographical comic Yummy Fur, and how much Canada influences his work and what Canadian readers get out of his story), some speculation on whether a canadian setting is enough to make something Canadian, and how Americans often write Canadian settings incomics like Alpha Flight.
Part Three: Editor of Canadian short SF Anthology "On Spec", Marianne Nelson (on the 'Canadian voice in Science Fiction'), Judith Merril (on how the looming presence of the environment in Canadian lives makes us more inclined towards SF even in mainstream works), Garfield and Judith Reeves-Stevens (on whether there's a particular Canadian voice in SF, and their view of no), Candas Jane Dorsey (on Canadian SF, and why it's so hard to recognize the Canadian SF community), Dave Duncan (the lack of the size of Canadian market making it hard to create a market for Canadian SF, but they do well across the border), Tanya Huff (about how Canadian settings are being a bit trendy), Spider Robinson (on his belief that Canadians are coming out of the closet), Guy Gabriel Kay (on it being okay to be a Canadian writer now, in general), Tanya Huff (on how we're between US and British styles)

April 18, 1991 - Ecology
Part One: Douglas Adams (on his non-fiction book about endangered species and how he came to write it, and some stuff about Madagascar), Garfield and Judith Reeves-Stevens (on why SF and Ecology are nothing new to SF, even if they're especially popular lately), Spider Robinson (about David Brin's novel Earth), Robert J. Sawyer (on Face of God, and a sort of eco-conscious aliens), Julian Grant on ecological themes in SF movies being as early as the 50s
Part Two: Steve Bissette (on Swamp Thing and how it evolved ecologically, and how DC lost interest in the ecological message after they left), Ty Templeton (on Clorophyll Kid and designing a terminally-ill Raccoon mascot for the Canadian government that wasn't looked upon too kindly), Gregory Benford (on whether technology and its waste byproducts will destroy us and why technology itself isn't a bad thing), Spider Robinson (on what he hopes from future technology and nanotechnology), Lewis Shiner and Larry Niven (on two competing ideas, why looking for technological solutions are a little wrongheaded, vs terraforming the Earth), Nancy Kress (on how the contradictory reports make it hard for the layman to really get a sense of how much, if any, danger there is)
Part Three: James Trefil (on how much science you need to know to understand the environmental issues), Gregory Benford (on why he feels people opposed to Nuclear Power usually aren't thinking things through). Pamela Sargent (on Terraforming, specifically terraforming Venus, and the moral issues behind it), Lois McMaster Bujold (on terraforming in Barrayar novels, and whether she thinks its too dangerous to try, and views on Nature, and whether smart is actually a survival characteristic long term), Douglas Adams (on sliding towards the edge of disaster, and whether humanity will go extinct, and his lack of despair at the idea)
newnumber6: (chase)
Well, for me it was, at least. Why? Because as I was walking from work to the comic store, and reading my book while walking as I normally do, my attention was caught by something on the sidewalk ahead of me. There was, lying in a tiny puddle of water (it'd been raining) was a $20 bill! Woot! Nobody around who looked like they might have dropped it, so I picked it up and used it to buy my comics.

This week I got two books:

New Mutants #4 (not bad, maybe a tiny bit lacking punch as a conclusion, but solid)
Runaways #13 (Worst of the Immonen arc so far)

Full reviews as usual at my comic reviews site for anyone interested.

Also, since I had the extra cash and was hungry, on the way home, I bought a gyro. A Lamb gyro, because it was the only store I've seen in a while that advertises it as an option on the sign outside (I'm sure more offer it, but if I can't see it outside I wouldn't go in to look). It was pretty good, only problem is the guy considered lettuce (and, oddly, a few french fries) as part of the standard gyro build. Lettuce does not work with a gyro, IMHO, it kind of dilutes the flavour. Fries wasn't bad, it just soaked up tzatziki juice. But anyway, it was still a gyro, just not the best I've had.

Work was okay, but rainy a bit which isn't the funnest to work in.
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
Wow, over the last week or so a whole lot of Prisoners of Gravity eps have appeared on Youtube. So, I'll do my usual link thing. Probably a couple/few a week till I catch up. I know my flist doesn't care about it, but I love this stuff and the interviews with SF authors on SF topics, so nyah.

Time Travel (December 1992)
Part One: Host Introductions and brief history of Time Travel in fiction, Interviews with L. Sprague deCamp (on Lest Darkness Fall, and inspirations for writing it, and problems in time travel of dealing with/understanding earlier versions of one's own tongue), Michael Moorcock ("Behold the Man", on why Time Travel's so compelling, and his novella/novel), John Gribbin (on the scientific plausibility of Time Travel)
Part Two: Gregory Benford (on his novel Timescape and time-reversibility of scientific equations, paradoxes), Geoffrey Landis (on drawing on Dirac's theories of time in his story Ripples in the Dirac Sea), Robert Silverberg (Ugly Little Boy/Up the Line, on the narrative choice to not go into much detail on the science, and his favorite time travel stories), Spider Robinson (on Heinlein's story "All You Zombies", full spoilers)
Part Three: Joe Haldeman (on his nebula award winning story The Hemmingway Hoax), Connie Willis (on Firewatch and Doomsday Book, and why her time travellers mess with the past, and on the perspective of future compared to the presence, plus a bit of talking about her not-at-that-point-released book To Say Nothing of the Dog)

Shared Worlds: (December 1992)
Part One: Interviews with James Morrow (on his objections to 'fiction to order' and shared worlds as literature by committee being anti-art, and yet his own contributions), C.J. Cherryh (on the shared world as a new literary form, and how the process tends to work), George R.R. Martin (on Wild Cards, and advantages/disadvantages of shared world setup and how multiple authors points of view can avoid making the author's moral views 'succeed')
Part Two: Neil Gaiman (on pitfalls of shared worlds to avoid, and how Sandman, one of his most famous works, is a shared world character he doesn't own, so how does he protect it), Fabian Nicieza (on how the X-books all fit together into one continuity. he also gets spit on), John Byrne (on keeping characters 'pure' in a shared world and correcting things you don't like in other works "right now" as opposed to waiting till they're gone, and Next Men, benefits of owning your own characters vs working on company characters), Walt Simonson (on playing in others sandboxes in comics)
Part Three: Peter David (on attractions of writing in shared worlds - Marvel, Trek, compared to the problems of being restricted in what you can do with the characters), J.M. Dillard (working on Star Trek novels, and how working with established characters is something of a 'free ride', but also restrictions), Judith and Garfield Reeve-Stevens (on writing Prime Directive, on how you maintain suspense when you know that the characters can't really be in any danger, and how you approach writing 'famous' characters), Harlan Ellison (on how he abhors shared worlds and that anyone who gets involved with them serves the devil)

Medea/Murasaki (Shared Worlds Part II) (December 1992)
Continuation of last episode: A look at two specific shared world concepts, one developed by Harlan Ellison himself, the second designed as Medea's "heir".

Part One: Origins of Medea in 1975, and the worldbuilding specs of the world, designed by the likes of Poul Anderson, Hal Clement, Larry Niven, Frederick Pohl, and others. Interviews with Harlan Ellison (on how it all started), Robert Silverberg (on receiving the specs and discussing them over dinner, and the seminar), notes about the biology of the Fuxes.
Part Two: Frank Kelly Freas (who did paintings and illustrations for the project, on the Fuxes unique life-cycle, Harlan Ellison (on choosing the last two writers after the seminar, and why only one female author was included), Kate Wilhelm (on her story for the book), Jack Williamson (on coming in late), Robert Silverberg (on writing the second-last story in the book, and forcing Harlan to write the last), Harlan Ellison (on what he thinks of Medea increasing the popularity of shared worlds). Introduction to Murasaki, designed as a fundraising effort, and some of the specs (by Pohl and Poul)
Part Three: Interviews with Frederick Pohl (on the different approaches to worldbuilding in Medea and Murasaki), David Brin (on how he got involved), Gregory Benford (on whether Murasaki is different/groundbreaking enough to warrant the effort, his arguments against the 'anti-art' argument, and failures of Murasaki), Nancy Kress (on being the only female author in Murasaki, and working with someone else's aliens), Robert Silverberg (on whether he things Murasaki lived up to Medea, and why Medea's out of print)

(Man, I wish we still had Prisoners of Gravity around).
newnumber6: (otp)
Continued from last post. First post of this whole series is here, for explanation purposes.

Let's get right to it.
Read more... )
Edit: Now continued here.
newnumber6: (chase)
Okay, so here's a continuation of my last WIDW, which was what I'd do with if I was writing Runaways

Vol 3 (in outline form, rather than full script or anything. Read the first post for my general rules of play and explanations for this, and of course for the first batch of issues. We'll start here with the next 12 issues, #12-24 (spread over two posts)
Read more... )
Continued here.
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
This week I got one book:

Captain Britain and MI13 #15 (sigh... last issue. But it went out pretty well, great issue)
Runaways #12 (okay... I think the magic may have left some, though)

Full reviews as usual at my comic reviews site for anyone interested.

Speaking of Runaways, had a dream with them in it. Them and zombies. Not the ones they fought though, these were actual undead. Although they weren't traditional zombies exactly, they had some variations Read more... )

Work was okay. They moved it to earlier in the day now so that I'll be getting comics after instead of before, but the time it'll take to do both works out about the same, and, on those weeks when I don't have comics (I'm only reading 2 books a month now that Captain Britain's gone, so that means at most I need to go every other week on average), I get home a lot earlier. Some other stuff happened that is a bit more mehhy and urge-to-kill risingish, but I don't particularly feel like talking about it, and it's still in a "see where it goes" stage.
newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
This week I got one book:

New Mutants #3 (pretty good, I'm enjoying the relaunch)

Full reviews as usual at my comic reviews site for anyone interested.

Work was okay. I showed up right as he did.

On the way home, because of all the commercials I stopped by at McDonalds and tried their Mediterranian snack wrap. It was not bad. Probably won't have it again (since I very rarely eat out at places like that), but I didn't regret trying it.

Also, after weeks of not being able to find one anywhere, I snagged another bag of Greek (Feta, Olive, and Oregano) potato chips. My precccious..... It was the only one there, alas. At the other grocery story that carries that brand, I see a box way up high on the shelf that's got that flavour, but it's underneath a couple other boxes of chips so they probably won't crack it open for a while. But I'll keep watching, and waiting.
newnumber6: (otp)
Continued from last post.
Read more... )

Edit: Now continued here.
All my WIDWs are here.
newnumber6: (chase)
Yes, it's time for another big long post that probably only entertains me, and I don't really expect anybody to read. But I've mentioned it offhandedly in a few posts, that I've been writing down my own sort of "alternate Volume 3 of Runaways", sort of a what might happen if, in some alternate universe, I was told to write Runaways instead of Terry Moore. Well, I've finished up to issue #12, and that seems like a good place to take a break and start posting it.

General introductory comments:Read more... )

We begin:Read more... )

continued next post, i write too much for LJ apparently.
newnumber6: (chase)
This week I got one book:

Runaways #11 (A little mixed, some nice character moments but the big events felt a little hollow)

Full reviews as usual at my comic reviews site for anyone interested.

At the used bookstore, I picked up:

Weapons of Choice, by John Birmingham
The SAS Fighting Techniques Handbook (New and Revised), by Terry White
Sunstorm, by Arthur C. Clarke and Stephen Baxter
All for 2 or 3 bucks each, in the 'we want to get rid of these' bin.

And speaking of Runaways, I've finished my complete issue by issue outline of my own first year of the title (assuming I took over immediately after the Secret Invasion crossover), and solicits through issue #24. Now starting on the outlines of those. :P Good thing I have no artistic ability whatsoever, or I'd probably be drawing it too.

Work was okay, but man was it hot today. Probably hottest work day I've had of the year. Yarg.

In other news... Uh oh. Heroes is screwed. I mean even more so. Yes, okay, it's gone to hell already and unrecoverable. Granted. But there are levels of everything. Bryan Fuller left again. Before the 4th Season has begun. Which mean the chance of redeeming qualities of 4th Season are about nil. Next I'm sure we'll be hearing they rehired Loeb. Can't blame Fuller for leaving the ongoing train-wreck though, especially when he can focus on his own work.

Oh, and those new brands of chips? The Baby-Back Ribs flavour does actually remarkably simulate the flavour of the last BBQ ribs I had, so thumbs up on that. But their "Greek" Flavour? Feta Cheese, Olive, and Oregano? I think it's just become my new favorite flavour. I'm addicted to those now. OMG. They're awesome. I say again OMG.
newnumber6: (lasers)
Haven't done one of these in a while, and don't remember ever doing these particular questions, so what the hell. Stolen from [livejournal.com profile] angelophile...

What's the last thing you did, where you technically broke the law? Read more... )
Edit: Whoops, forgot to cut. Sorry about that.

Profile

newnumber6: Ghostly being (Default)
newnumber6

November 2009

S M T W T F S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Oct. 23rd, 2017 06:58 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios